Ghost

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I’m so busy, that I didn’t even know that you didn’t call for three days and thirteen hours.

Just finished City Hunter but I will forever love this scene!

o-blessed-king-of-longing:

The secret Getting-Owned-by-Casca Technique passed down through the Corbolwitz Family for over 300 years!

(Source: betamachine)

crossoverhere:

pirikko:

oh gosh oh geez i’ve gotta skip town

this is still my favorite animal crossing comic ever

yxxz:

i’ve never seen police throw tear gas or shoot rubber bullets at Westboro Baptist protestors. 

Another version just because!

kawaiifix:

Clara Teru Teru Bozu  by Kawaii Fix
Isabel González

On August 30, 1902, Federico Degetau, an expert in international law and the firstResident Commissioner of Puerto Rico to the United States House of Representatives,[11] unaware of the Gonzalez situation, wrote to the Secretary of Statein protest of the new rules that made Puerto Ricans subject to immigration laws. His protest was forwarded to the Treasury Department. Degetau then contacted Le Barbier and Parker, who informed him that they planned to appeal Gonzalez’s case to the Supreme Court.[1]
Once González lost her administrative appeal, she switched tactics. She decided to appeal and to take her case to the United States Supreme Court, however this time instead of focusing on the “public charge” issue, she decided to take up the issue that all Puerto Ricans were citizens of the United States and as such should not be detained, treated as aliens and denied entry into the United States.[3]
Degetau saw in the case of Isabel González the perfect “test case” because now it would not be about whether immigration inspectors, following guidelines suffused with concepts of race and gender, deemed Isabel González and her family desirable. The case now would be about settling the status of all the native islanders who were in existence at the time the Spanish possessions were annexed by the United States.[1] By February 16, 1903, Frederic René Coudert, Jr., an international-law attorney from New York, who launched the Downes v. Bidwell case for clients protesting tariffs levied on goods shipped between Puerto Rico and the United States, joined Paul Fuller, Charles E. LeBarbier and Degetau in the Gonzalez case as a collaborator.[1]
The case, which became known as Gonzáles v. Williams, was argued in the U.S. Supreme Court on December 4 and 7, 1903, with Chief Justice Melville Weston Fuller presiding. The case sparked administrative, legal, and media discussions about the status of Puerto Ricans. It also questioned the issues of immigration and U.S. doctrines in the treatment of U.S. citizens, chiefly women and people of color (dark-skinned). González and her lawyers moved among the legal realms, aided by shared languages of race, gender, and morality, while the U.S. solicitor general Henry M. Hoyt, focused on what he considered were failed parents, rearing children outside moral, economically self-sufficient homes.[1]
González, who was out on bond, secretly married her fiancé and thus became “a citizen of this country through marriage,” and acquired the right to remain stateside. She could have ended her appeal, but instead she decided to press her claim that all Puerto Ricans were U.S. citizens.[3]

On January 4, 1904, the Court determined that under the immigration laws, González was not an alien, and therefore could not be denied entry into New York. The court, however declined to declare that she was a U.S. citizen. The question of the citizenship status of the inhabitants of the new island territories, and their situation remained confusing, ambiguous, and contested. Puerto Ricans came to be known as something in between: “noncitizen nationals.”[3]

This is such an important court case for all Puerto Ricans. A true Hero! Unfortunately things like this aren’t taught in school but we must know our history

Isabel González

On August 30, 1902, Federico Degetau, an expert in international law and the firstResident Commissioner of Puerto Rico to the United States House of Representatives,[11] unaware of the Gonzalez situation, wrote to the Secretary of Statein protest of the new rules that made Puerto Ricans subject to immigration laws. His protest was forwarded to the Treasury Department. Degetau then contacted Le Barbier and Parker, who informed him that they planned to appeal Gonzalez’s case to the Supreme Court.[1]

Once González lost her administrative appeal, she switched tactics. She decided to appeal and to take her case to the United States Supreme Court, however this time instead of focusing on the “public charge” issue, she decided to take up the issue that all Puerto Ricans were citizens of the United States and as such should not be detained, treated as aliens and denied entry into the United States.[3]

Degetau saw in the case of Isabel González the perfect “test case” because now it would not be about whether immigration inspectors, following guidelines suffused with concepts of race and gender, deemed Isabel González and her family desirable. The case now would be about settling the status of all the native islanders who were in existence at the time the Spanish possessions were annexed by the United States.[1] By February 16, 1903, Frederic René Coudert, Jr., an international-law attorney from New York, who launched the Downes v. Bidwell case for clients protesting tariffs levied on goods shipped between Puerto Rico and the United States, joined Paul Fuller, Charles E. LeBarbier and Degetau in the Gonzalez case as a collaborator.[1]

The case, which became known as Gonzáles v. Williams, was argued in the U.S. Supreme Court on December 4 and 7, 1903, with Chief Justice Melville Weston Fuller presiding. The case sparked administrative, legal, and media discussions about the status of Puerto Ricans. It also questioned the issues of immigration and U.S. doctrines in the treatment of U.S. citizens, chiefly women and people of color (dark-skinned). González and her lawyers moved among the legal realms, aided by shared languages of race, gender, and morality, while the U.S. solicitor general Henry M. Hoyt, focused on what he considered were failed parents, rearing children outside moral, economically self-sufficient homes.[1]

González, who was out on bond, secretly married her fiancé and thus became “a citizen of this country through marriage,” and acquired the right to remain stateside. She could have ended her appeal, but instead she decided to press her claim that all Puerto Ricans were U.S. citizens.[3]

On January 4, 1904, the Court determined that under the immigration laws, González was not an alien, and therefore could not be denied entry into New York. The court, however declined to declare that she was a U.S. citizen. The question of the citizenship status of the inhabitants of the new island territories, and their situation remained confusing, ambiguous, and contested. Puerto Ricans came to be known as something in between: “noncitizen nationals.”[3]

This is such an important court case for all Puerto Ricans. A true Hero! Unfortunately things like this aren’t taught in school but we must know our history

My husband and I bonded over cosplay. It’s OUR hobby that we love, share and work on together! - Budgielove Cosplay

My husband and I bonded over cosplay. It’s OUR hobby that we love, share and work on together! - Budgielove Cosplay

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